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Grand Rapids 



BEAUTIFUL 
INDUSTRIAL 
COMMERCIAL 



The 
Grand Rapids Board of Trade 



COMPILED 

BY 

DICKINSON BROTHERS. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH 







ENTRANCE TO BOARD OF TRAIJF 



AHi -■- lai 1 



Co tijf iflnntJtrfi of tl)c (^ranti i^apitis 93oarti of Cratie 
anti E^raticrs of tljis (Erecting;: 



The iHiblication of this illustnited souvenir "Book of Grantl Rajjids" was arranged 
ft)r l)y tiie Board of Directors through the undersigned committee. 

Its purposes are many, chief among them being the advertising of (irand Kajjids. The 
large general distribution of a publication of such excellence pictorially and in a literary way, 
ought to give the impression among non-residents that our city is a community of unusual 
attractions as a manufacturing and commercial center, as well as a delectable spot in which to 
really live. 

The requests from all |)oints of the compass for literature setting forth our characteristics 
are numerous, and with this book we expect to partially satisfy incpiiries. 

Not only that, but the appreciation by our own people of their ha])py and prosperous 
home city will be quickened, and they will be placed in a position to more easily detail our 
good points to those of other parts. 

In order that the reading matter might be authoritative in the facts stated, as well as 
varied in style, the following gentlemen have kindly taken care of the sut)jects following their 
respective names: 

'Sir. Lewis G. Stuart, "Brief History of Grand Rapids." 

Mr. William H. Gilbert, "Industrial Statistics, and Reasons why we are an Ifleal 

Manufacturing Center." 

Mr. Louis A. Cornelius, "A City of Varied Industries." 

Mr. John Ihlder, "A City of Homes — Beautiful, Safe, Clean, Healthful." 

Mr. Robert W. Irwin, "Transportation." 

Mr. Walter K. Plumb, "As a Wholesale Market." 

Mr. Chas. W. Garfield, "A Great Horticultural Center.^ 

Mr. Henry Yinkemulder, "Market Gardening and Produce." 

Mr. Clay H. Hollister, "Banking." 

Expressing our appreciation of the unusual accomplishments of the administration of 
Nineteen-nine — ten, anticipating as full a measure of success for Nineteen-eleven — twelve, 
and with many thanks to those who participated in the preparation and [jublication of this 
volume, the same is respectively submitted. 

ALBERT B. MERRITT, Chairman 
ROY S. BARNHART, 
CHARLES TRANKLA, 

Special Committee. 



€>ffirrr5 of 0rantJ iAapitis ISoarti of Cratir 

j^incrccnsDunDrcD Ccn 




OFFICERS 

Heber A. Knott, President 

Charles M. Alden, Vice President 

Christian Galimeyer, Vice President 

Lavant Z. Caukin, Treasurer 

Clarence A. Cotton, Secretary 



DIRECTORS 



Anderson, William H. 
Briggs, George G . 

Musselman, Amos S. 
Perkins, Gaius \V. 



EX-PRESIDENTS 



Stevens, Sidney F. 
Stowe, Ernest A. 

Whitworth, (jeorge G 



LIFE 



Ball, Orson A. 

Conger, Eugene D. 
Covode, John A. 
Fisher, Ernest B. 
Foote, Elijah H, 

Gilbert, William H. 
Harvey, Cornelius L. 
Hollister, Clay H. 
Hughart, John H. 
Idema, Henry 



Lemon, Samuel M. 
Leonard, Charles H. 
Miller, Frederick C. 
Rindge, Lester J. 
Shelby, William R. 
Sligh, Charles R. 
Stuart, W'Uiam J. 
Withey, Lewis H. 
Wylie, James R. 



TERMS EXPIRE FEBRUAR Y, 1911 



Alexander, James G. 
Barnhart, Roy S. 
Briggs, Fred M . 
Graham, Robert D. 

Hanchett, Benjamin S, 
Jewell, Harry D. 
Logic, William 
Martin John B. 
Merritt, Albert B. 



Morman, Samuel A. 
Palmer, W, Millard 
Sehler, John 

Tobey, Fred W. 
Trankla, Charles 

V'andenberg, Arthur H. 
Welton, Frank 

Wishart, Alfred W. 
Wilson, Charles M. 
Wilmarth, Lewis T. 



TERMS EXPIRE FEBRUAR Y. 1912 



Baxter, Alfred 

Booth, Edmund W. 
Brown. Alvah W. 

Butterfield, Roger C. 
Clapperton, George 
Cornelius Louis A. 
Garfield, Charles W. 
Holdcn, Charles 
Irwin, Robert W. 

Lancaster, Charles O. 



McNabb, John 
May, Meyer S. 
Norris, Mark 

Plumb, Walter K, 

Sheppard, William C. 
Sinclair, George F. 
Strahan, Thomas W. 
Sweet, Edwin, F. 

Vinkemulder, Henry J 
White, Arthur S. 



Cl)airmcu of Committrrs 




CHARLES C. CARGILL CHARLES W. GARFIELD ERNEST A. STOWE 

JOHN UlLDER JOHN A. COVODE 

ORSON A. BALL JOSEPH A. SOLOMONS CHARLES TRANKLA 

\V. MILLARD PALMER WALTER K. PLUMB FRANK W ELT(JN 



Committers of tijr il3oarti of Cratie 



Orson A. Ball 

Christian Gallmever 
Clay H. Hollister 
Robert \V. Irwin 
John B. Martin 

Amos S. Musselman 



Ernest B. Fisher 



Elijah H. Foote 



Ralph H. Child 



Salathiel R. Fletcher 
John C. GulUford 



Colin P. Campbell 
Jesse B. Davis 
William H. Gay- 
Claude T. Hamilton 
John H. P. Hughart 



Henry L. Adxit 

Melville R. Bissell. Jr. 
Alvah W. Brown 
Comstock Konkle 
William E. Cox 



Gustav H. Behnke 



EXECUTI\'E 
ERNEST A. STOWE. Chairman. 



APPEALS 
mark: KOKKIS,, Chairman 



ARBITRATION" 
JOHN A. COVODE. Chairman 



AUDITING 
FRANK WELTON. Chairman 



BUILDING 
ORSON A. BALL. Chairman 



Walter K. Plumb 
Lester J. Rindge 
Sidney F. Stevens 
George G. Whitvvorth 
Charles M. Wilson 



William F. McKnight 



Harry D. Jewell 



Cornelius L. Harve 



N. Fred Avery 

George W. Bunker 
Charles J. Carpenter 
John DeKruif 

James R. Fitzpatrick 
Charles S. Hathaway 
Alba L. Holmes 
Charles H. Leonard 



Frank S. Robinson 
Benn M. Corwin 

CONVENTION 
ROV S. BARNHART. Chairman 
ANDREW FVFE. Via- Chairman 

James Lombard 

William F. McKnighi 
Guy W. Rouse 
Sidnev Steele 

Dudley E. Waters 

ENTERTAINMENT OF \'ISITORS 
CHARLES B. KELSEV. Chairman 

Dr. Silas E. D:)dson 

James T. McAllister 

William Aldrich Tateun 
Ben Wolf 

FLOUR AND GRAIN 
FRANK A. \'OIGT. Chairman 

Fred N. Rowe 
GRAND R1\'ER 
IMPRO\-EMENT AND NA\TGATION 
CHRISTIAN GALLMEYER. Chairman 

Charles McQuewan 
Gaius W. Perkins 
Henry A. Schuil 
John Sehler 



Charles R. Sligh 
Joseph W. Spooner 
Thomas W. Strahan 
William J. Stuart 



INDUSTRIAL 
WILLIAM H. GILBERT. Chairman 



Frank J. Cook 
Peter W. Decker 
Theodore Ensel 
James W. Hunter 
Karl Judson 
Meyer S. May 



Jesse B. Davis 
Charles Holden 



Roger C. Butterfield 
Carroll C. Follmer 
Henry T. Heald 
Edgar A. Maher 



Charles B. Hamilton 
Morris A. Heyman 



Charles M. Alden 
Arthur W. Bell 

Louis A. Cornelius 



Joseph Renihan 
Charles F. Rood 
Howard Thornton 
Charles A. Trankla 
Dudley E. Waters 
Charles G. Watkins 



Jl'NIOR BOARD OF TRADE 
WALTER K. VLV'MQ, Chairman 



H. Bruce Moore 
Herbert E. Sargent 



LEGISLATION 
GEORGE CLAPPERTON. Chairman 



Gaius W. Perkins 

Arthur H. \'andenberg 
Charles M. Wilson 
Roger I. WyKes 



LOCAL TRADE RECIPROCITY 

CHARLES TRANKLA. Chairman 



MEMBERSHIP 
FRED M. BRIGGS. Chairman 



J. Frank Quinn 
Carroll F. Sweet 



Cornelius L. Harvey 
S. Eugene Osgood 
Willard F. Stanton 



Cbairmtn of Committfcs 




CHARLES HOLDliN ,\I,HI-.RI H .MKKKlll llKl 1R( lli ( I.APPKUTdN 

JOHN B MARTIN KDWARD K PRK IIKTT 

WILLIAM H. GILBERT FRED M. BRIGGS ROV S. BARNIIART 

ANDREW FYFE MARK NORRIS FRANK A. VOIGT 



Committers of tljc Boarti of Cratic 



RETAIL DEALERS 
JOSEPH A. SOLOMONS. Chairman 



Alfred Baxter 

Howard C. Brink 
John Buvs 

Guy W. Chaffee 
Cornelius Dosker 
Glen E. Denise 
Adolph Friedman 
Julius A. J. Friedrich 
Ira C. Henry 

Joseph C. Herkner 

Henry B. Herpolsheimer 
Henry C. Houseman 



Philip J. Klinyman 
Henry J Krekel 

Charles O. Lancaster 
Meyer S. May 

Charles E. Norton 
Percy S. Peck 

Harry G. Robertson 
Hugo A. Schneider 
John J. Thomson 

Clarence R, V'anderpool 
Ben E. West 

William M. Wurzburg 



SOCIAL 
CHARLES HOLDEN. Chairman 



David M. Amberg 
Harry C. Angell 
George B. Caufield 
Rolland J. Cleland 
William E. Cox 
Charles E. Dregge 
H. Monroe Dunham 
Willard R. Griffiths 
Ferry K. Heath 

Charles McQuewan 



Patrick H. O'Brien 
Charles E. Phelps 
Frank D. Row 
Huntley Russell 

Charles H. Strawhecker 
Ralph P. Tietsort 

Clarence J. Van Etten 
Alfred W. Wishart 
Hugh E. Wilson 



TRANSPORTATION 
EDWARD K. PRICHETT. Chairman 



Arthur S. Ainsworth 
Ralph H. Apted 
Roy S. Barnhart 
Harold C. Cornelius 
Ernest L. Ewing 
Frank E. Jones 



William Logic 
John D. Raab 
William S. Rowe 
Carroll F. Sweet 

Henry J. Vinkemulder 
Clifford H. Walker 



WHOLESALE DEALERS 
ALBERT B. MERRITT, Chairman 



Wm. F. Blake 

Arthur C. Chapman 
John Dietrich 

Marshall D. Elgin 
William B. Holden 
Lee M. Hutchins 
Samuel Krause 
Frank E. Leonard 
William Logie 
Walter K. Plumb 



Richard J. Prendergast 
Guy W. Rouse 
lohn Sehler 
Arthur T. Slaght 
Daniel C. Steketee 
Ernest A. Stowe 

Henry J. Vinkemulder 
Frank A. Voigt 
Claude P. Wykes 



i^umcipal OTairsi Committees 

JOHN B. MARTIN. Chairman 
CHARLES W. GARFIELD. Vi(X Chairman 



BETTER GOVERNED CITY 
ROBERT W. IRWIN. Chairman 



Frank M. Byam 
Jesse B. Davis 

H. Monroe Dunham 
Claude T. Hamilton 
Tames E. Hardman 
Henry T. Heald 

Cornelius H. Jongejan 
William H. Kinsey 
Stuart E. Knappen 
John S. Ml Donald 



Harold A. McNitt 
Benjamin P. Merrick 
Mark Norris 

Forris D. A. Stevens 
Lewis G. Stuart 
Elvin Swarthout 
Philip H. Travis 
Ro^er 1. Wykes 
James R. Wylie 



CITVS NEIGHBORS 
ERNEST A. STOWE. Chairman 



deorgL- M. Ames 

William H. Anderson 
Orson A. Ball 

Colin P. Campbell 
E. Alfred Clements 
Eugene D. Conger 
Joseph E. Coulter 
Robert D.Graham 
Sam Kaat 

George T. Kendal 



John F. Xellist 

Charles N. Remington 
I. Preston Rice 
Henry Smith 
Lewis G. Stuart 
Daniel W Tower 
Marshall Uhl 

William Widdicomb 
Theodore O. Williams 



lO 



Cfjairmcu of Commtttrrs 




DK. CULLINS H. JOIIN'STON' 
CHARLES B. KELSKY 
WILLIAM C. SHEPPARD 



ROBERT W. IRWIX 
LOUIS A. CORNELIUS 
CHARLES O. LAN'CASTER 



REV. ALFRED W. WISIIART 
EDWIN F. SWEET 
CHARLES N. REMINGTON 



II 



iHunictpal Mairs Committees— Continueti 



CLEANER CITY 
WALTER K. PLUMB. Chairman 



James G. Alexander 
Albert E. Brooks 
James M. Crosby 
George A. Davis 
Charles L. Grinnell 
John G. Gronberg 
Ferry K. Heath 
Karl S. Judson 



Edward K. Pritchett 
Henry Ritzema 
Earle R. Stewart 
Charles E. Tarte 

Frederick K. Tinkham 
Arthur S. White 

Edward D. Winchester 
Percy E. Witherspoon 



HEALTHIER CITY 



COLLINS 
John W. Blodgett 
George S. Boltwood 
Samuel S. Corl 

Edward M. Deane 
John De K.ruif 
William DeLano 
Carroll C. Follmer 
Marcus B. Hall 



H. JOHNSTON. Chairman 

Spencer D. Hinman 
John N. McCormick 
Malcolm C. Sinclair 
Richard R. Smith 
Fred A. Twamley 
Alden H. Williams 
Gustave A. Wolf 



MORE BEAUTIFUL CITY 
CHARLES N. REMINGTON, Chair7nan 



John B. Barlow 
Frederic L. Baxter 
Henr>- P. Belknap 
Fred M. Briggs 
Charles C. Cargill 
George E. Fitch 
Charles H. Gleason 
Eugene Goebel 

Addison S. Goodman 
William A. Greeson 
Charles Holden 

William F. McKnight 



John Mowat 

J. Pomeroy Munson 
Park Robbins 
Fred N. Rowe 

George A. Rumsey 
Herbert E. Sargent 
Robert E. Shanahan 
Albert N. Spencer 
Joseph W. Spooner 
James S. Stiles 
Bruce O. Tippy 



PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS 
EDWIN F. SWEET. Chairman 



Charles M. Alden 
Louis W. Anderson 
Edward H. Barnes 
Arthur W. Bell 
John Buys 

Louis A. Cornelius 
Albert G. Dickinson 
Salathiel R. Fletcher 
Samuel A. Freshney 
Cornelius L. Harvey 



G. Adolph Krause 
Francis F. Letellier 
Fred C. Miller 
Ehlert A. Meves 
S. Eugene Osgood 
Samuel H. Ranck 
John P. Rusche 
John Sehler 

Clarence R. Vanderpool 
Charles M. Wilson 



SAFER CITY 



WILLIAM C. SHEPPARD. Chairman 
FRANCIS D. CAMPAU, Sub-Chair man 



Henry J. Brower 
George W. Bunker 
Leon T. Closterhouse 
Benn M. Corwin 
Charles E. Dregge 
Gerald Fitzgerald 
John W. Goodspeed 
William Judson 



John S. Lawrence 
W. Henry Le Moine 
John McNabb 

Samuel A. Morman 
W. Millard Palmer 
Lester J. Rindge 
\'an A, Wallin 

Otto H. L. Wernicke 



SOCIAL WELFARE 
ALFRED W. WISHART, Chairman 



Harr>- C. Angell 
Ralph H. Apted 
William D. Bishop 
Edmund W. Booth 
John T. Byrne 

RoUand J. Cleland 
William H. Gay 
Clay H. Hollister 
Harry D. Jewell 
Gerrit J. Johnson 

Herbert C. McConnell 



Meyer S. May 
Adrian Otte 

Willis B. Perkins 
John A. Schmitt 
Ralph H. Spencer 
Howard A. Thornton 
Ralph P. Tietsort 
Corwin S. Udell 
Van A. VS'aUin 

Charles G. Watkins 
Frank H. West 



Colin P. Campbell 
Lewis P. Cody 



MUNICIPAL TRADEMARK 
CHARLES C. CARGILL, Chairman 



F. Stuart Foote 

George H. Seymour 



12 



Committee of €>nt %m\t}xt^ 



\V. MILLARD PALMKR, Lhat. 



Dixisions of Trades and ProtVssions 



DRV GOODS AND MILLINERY: 

Paul F. Slekctce 

Ira. M. Smith 

Morris Friedman 
BOOTS AND SHOES: 

Jolm \V. (iootlspeed 

(i. Adolph Krausp 

Will, okiiiaii 
FOUNDERS AND NLXCHINISTS: 

William E. Elliott 

\'iitor M. Tuthill 

Henry J. Hartmanii 
HARDWARE. SPORTING GOODS. ETC: 

Charles F. Rood 

William B. Jarvis 

Herbert L. Paye 
IM.IMHING AND HEATING APPARATUS: 

Wiltiuin T. McGurrin 

I !:irold V. Cornelius 

Gleiuion A. Riehards 
DRUGS. MEDICINES AND CHEMICALS; 

Herand Sehrouder 

John D. Miiir 

Clarenie R. \"anderpool 

JEWELRY AND KINDRED LINES: 
Louis G. Russell 
W illiam D. Werner 
Joseph Sienel 
, CLOTHlN(;. HATS AND FURNISHINGS: 
Eugene W. Jones 
James Benjamin 
Bernard S. May 
B.VNKERS AND BROKERS: 
Dudley E. Waters 
Charles B. Kelsey 
Claude T. Hamilton 
. STATIONERY. OFFICE SITPPLIES AND S\STEMS: 
Isaac WaKfmaker 
Julius Tiseh 
Charles M. Bixby 
. GROCERIES AND KINDRED LINES: 
Richard U Pendergast 
Gi-ii E DeNise 
Norman Orlelt 
BAKERS AND CONFECTIONERS: 
Ri.hard R. Bean 
Charles S. landorf 
Albert B. Wilmink 
. TRAFFIC- LINES: 

Ivlmund C. Leavenworth 
Ihmh J. Gray 
Arthur C. Goodson 
, HOTELS AND RESTAURANTS: 
J. Boyd Pantlind 
John .\. Bauman 
Arvid B. Gardner 
. THEATRES AND AMUSEMENTS: 
Louis J. DeLamarler 
Austin McFadden 
.\lbert J. Gilliuham 
I. PIANOS AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS: 
John H. Brockmeler 
Clayton H. Hoffman 
Mendelssohn M. Marrin 
. PRINTERS. LITHOGRAPHERS. ENGRA\ERS. Etc. 
Albert (j. Dickinson 
Charles C. CarBiH 
Henry L. Adzit 
i. LUMBER: 

Fred I. Nichols 
Carroll F. Sweet 
Lawton L. Skillman 



FURNITURE MANUFACTURERS: 

F. Stuart Foote 

Addison S. Goodman 

Ralph P. Tietsort 
FURNITURE DEALERS: 

Frank B. Winegar 

Morris He\man 

William D. Bishop 
FURNITl'RE SUPPLIES: 

Miner S. Keeler 

Fred K. Tinkham 

Joseph S. Hart 
PUBLISHERS: 

Jolin W. Hunter 

John G. Gronberg 

Warren M. Fuller 
ELECTRIC CONCERNS: 

Lewis P. Cody 

Guy W. Lewis 

John S. Noel 
SEEDS. FRUITS AND PRODUCE: 

Alfred J. Brown 

H. Bruce Moore 

Alexander Miller 
REAL ESTATE AND INVESTMENTS: 

Emerson W. Bliss 

William H. Kinsey 

Salathiel R. Fletcher 
ARCHITECTS. CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS SUP- 
PLIES. 

S. Eugene Osgood 

Frank H. McDonald 

William C. Hoertz 
INSURANCE: 

James M. Crosby 

William H. Looniis 

Carroll H. Perkins 
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS: 

Jose[ih B. Griswold 

Malcolm C. Sinclair 

Ralph H. Apted 
CIGARS AND TOBACCO 

Cliflford A. Mitts 

John Dietrich 

George H. Seymour 
FUEL: 

George C Schroeder 

Abram B. Knowlson 

John M. Himes 
ATTORNEYS; 

Colin P. Campbell 

Wilti:im F. McKnight 

Charles M. Owen 

WALL PAPER. PAINTS AND GLASS: 
David C. Scribner 
Fred C. Canfield 

MISCELLANEOUS: 

Bruce O. Tippv 
Melville R. Bissell 
Charles E. Tarte 

VEHICLES AND IMPLEMENTS: 
Sherwood Hall 
Charles E. Belknap 
.\lfred Schantz 

AUTOMOBILES; 

Walter S. Farrant 
James E. Austin 
Fred Z. Pantlind 

MEAT DEALERS: 
John J. Blickle 
Frank J. Dettenthaler 
Alfred C. Bertch 



13 



Articles ilabe in #ranb EapibS 



Anioii^- the products iiiaiuifactureil in (iraiid Rapids are the following; 



Adding Miudiini's 

Adding Mat-hiru- Tiililf 

Advertising Novelties 

Alabiistine 

Aluminum Castings 

Art Needle Work 

Art Leaded Glass 

Asbestos Table Covers 

Automobiles 

Automobile Parts 

Awnings 

Badges 

Baked Goods 

Band Instruments 

Bags 

Barrels 

Bath Heaters 

Beds 

Bed Springs 

Benches 

Bee Keepers' Supplies 

Belting 

Belt Lacers 

Biscuits 

Blacksmiths' Supplies 

Blank Books 

Blow Piping 

Blinds 

Boats 

Boilers 

Bookcases 

Boots 

Books 

Boxes 

Brass Goods 

BufTets 

Beer 

Bread 

Brick 

Bridges 

Bronze Goods 

Brooms 

Brushes 

Building Materials 

Button Fasteners 

Buttons 

Cakes 

Carbonated Drinks 

Canned Gooils 

Carpet Sweepers 

Carriages 

Casters 

Caskets 

Catsups 

Card Index Cabinets 

Catalogs 

Cement Bluck-i 

Cement Machines 

Cereal Foods 

Cigars 

Cigar Boxes 

Chairs 

Chamber Suits 

Chewing Gum 

Clocks 

Clothing 

Church Seats 

Cider 

Coal Bags 

Corsets 

Corset Accessories 

Coal Tar 

Coats 

Coffins 

Coke 

Confectionery 

Cornices 

Cotton Felt 

Couches 



Crackers 

Crating 

Coupon Books 

Cut Stone 

Dental Supplies 

Desks 

Dies 

Dining Room Fiirnilurr 

Doors 

Door Plates 

Draughting Room Furniture 

Drill Grinders 

Drugs 

Dust Arresters 

Electric Batteries 

Electric Dynamos 

Electric Fans 

Electric Motors 

Electric Signs 

Electrical Supplies 

Electrotypes 

Elevators 

Embalming Fluid 

Embalming Supplies 

Engines 

Engravings 

Engravers Wood 

Excelsior 

Exhaust Fans 

Fertilizers 

Filing Devices 

Films 

Filters 

Fire Brick 

Fire Clay 

Firele?s Cookers 

Flags 

Flavoring Extracts 

Floor Compound 

Flour 

Feed 

Fire Escapes 

Fluid Extract 

Fly Nets 

Fly Paper 

Furnaces 

Furniture 

Furniture Packing Pads 

Furniture Polish 

Furniture Supplies 

Furniture Trimmings 

Gas Engines 

Gasoline Engines 

Gold Finish Furniture 

Gas 

Garments 

Gas Machines 

Gas Fixtures 

Gypsum Products 

Gas Grates 

Ginger Ale 

Gloves 

Glue 

Glue Pots 

Grates 

Graining Machines 

Grill Work 

Grinding Machines 

Hair Tonic 

Handles 

Hardware 

Harness 

Hearses 

Heating Systems 

Hosiery 

Horse Collars 

Horse Shoes 

Ice 

Ice Cream 



Iron Work 

Iron Castings 

Interior Finish 

Jewelry 

Knit Goods 

L;.beU 

Launches 

Liiwn Furniturt- 

Lap Robes 

Leather 

Legal Blanks 

Letter Files 

Li me 

Lithographing 

Lockers 

Locomotive Headlights 

Loose Leaf Devices 

Lumber 

Machine Tools 

Machinerv 

MalK-ahle' Iron 

Manlih 

Medals 

Macaroni 

Mattresses 

Medicines 

Metal Polish 

Mill Supplies 

Millinery 

Mirrors 

Monuments 

Mops 

Moulding 

Musical Goods 

Music Cabinets 

Near Beer 

Novelties 

Office Fixtures 

Office Supplies 

Optical Goods 

Opera Seats 

Ornamental Iron Work 

Ornamental Stucco Work 

Overalls 

Paint 

Parlor Furniture 

Paper 

Paper Boxes 

Pedestals 

Paste 

Perfumes 

Photo Supplies 

Pianos 

Piano Cases 

Pickles 

Picture Frames 

Pillows 

Pies 

Pipe Covering 

Plaster 

Plaster Board 

Plumbers" Supplies 

Postal Cards 

Poultry Supplies 

Preserves 

Printing 

Printers' Supplies 

Propeller Wheels 

Prnjirietarv Medicines 

Punches 

Radiators 

Racks 

Railroad Cars 

Reed ware 

Refrigerators 

Road Building Machinery 

Roads 

Roller Bearing Axles 

Roll Paper Cutters 



Roofing 

Roofing Materials 

Rubber Stamps 

Rugs 

Saratoga Chips 

Sash 

Sash Pulleys 

Sample Cases 

School Seats 

Sausages 

Saws 

Saw Gauges 

Sewer Pipe 

Scales 

Sectional Bookcases 

School Supplies 

Screens 

Sheet Iron 

Steel Sanitary Furniture 

Steel Shelving 

Steel Opera Seats 

.Shingle Mill Machinery 

Shipping Packages 

Shirts 

Shoes 

Show Cases 

Sleighs 

Soap 

Souvenirs 

Souvenir Post Cards 

Sprinkler Systems 

Stationery 

Steam Heaters 

Steam Turbines 

Steel Ceilings 

Stencils 

Store Fixtures 

Straw Board 

Tallow 

Tables 

Tanks 

Tents 

Tile 

Tinware 

Tobacco 

Tools 

Toys 

Trucks 

Toilet Preparations 

Trunks 

Twine Holders 

Type. 

Typewriter Desks 

Typewriters 

Umbrellas 

Undertakers" Supplies 

Underwear 

Upholstery Goods 

Upholstered Furniture 

Vacuum Cleaners 

Varnishes 

Veneers 

Ventilating Svstems 

Vises 

Wagons 

Wardrobes 

Wall Coating 

Washing Machines 

Water ^lotors 

Weather Strips 

Whips 

Window Shade Adjusters 

Wood Carving 

Woodenware 

Wood Working Machinery 

Wooden Shoes 

Wrapper^ 



#ranb Eapib^ in a i5ut ^fjell 



14 



Po|)iilati()ii, city and suburbs _ . _ 

Area of city in square miles 

Area of city parks in acres 

Number of railroads entering city 

Miles of street railway — electric 

Interurban electric roads _ _ - 

Miles of improved streets _ . . 

Miles of asphalt streets . _ . 

Miles of water mains laid ... 

Number of fire hydrants _ _ . 

Gallons capacity of pumps per day 

Average daily consumption, in gallons 

Number of miles of public sewers 

Number of street lights 

Number of telephones used in city 

Number of public and private hospitals 

Newspapers _____ 

Public works, value . _ _ 

Schools . . _ _ _ 

Pu])ils . _ _ . 

Clearing house business, 1909 _ . _ 

Factories _ . _ . 

Number of hands employed in factories 

Daily pay roll _ _ _ , 

Ca])ital invested _ _ . . 

Products _ _ _ - 

Value of fruit marketed for season of 1910 

Churches _ . .. 

Public library, volumes . _ . 

Volumes in law library _ _ _ 

Assessed valuation of Real Estate 

I'nblic buildings _ _ _ _ 

Number of residences _ . _ _ 

Banks . _ _ . 

Total capital and surplus _ _ _ 

Trust companies, 1; capital 

Death rate average per 1,000 

Number of trains in and out of llie Inion Depot, 

Tickets sold at I'nion Station 

Number of street railway j)assengers carrieil 

Jobbing and wholesale firms, 1''24; sales 



125,000 

17.50 

_ 218.08 

5 

63.13 
a 

184 

- 6M 

196 

1,409 

"28,000.000 

. 15,'253,000 

172 

_ 545 

_ 15,000 

_ 10 

3 daily, 27 weekly, 23 others 

$1,949,974.98 

Public 38, Private 27 

22,250 

_ $123,786,904.07 

_ 508 

- 22,238 

$35,576.00 

$28,500,000 

. $43,000,000 

$2,500,000 

_ 120 

112.116 

8.000 

$85,324,200 

. 41 

_ 19,873 

. 13 

$5,600,000 

$200,000 

11 

year 1910 . 30,037 

. _ _ 563,385 

. 15,141,898 

$40,000,000 



Compliments! from ©utsibe 

In order that the splendid showing made in this book for Grand Rapids may not appear entirely as self- 
encomiumed, we are publishing a few of the many "testimonials"' by men prominent elsewhere. All of those who 
are members of the Grand Rapids Board of Trade come in that class of "testimonialers" who have "taken Grand 
Rapids" and will "take no other." Following are a few of the comments by outsiders, thanks for which are 
hereby returned: 



"But the one thing I wish to mention here is the puhlic 
spirit — the Zeitgeist — of Grand Rapids. This is a thing that 
differentiates her from almost every other city in theUnited States. 

An efficient "machine" for expressing the Zeitgeist is 

absolutely necessary because an individual protest is pooh-hooed, 
shelved, pigeon-holed, or given the hoarse haw-haw. Id fact, 
"the gang" can direct its displeasure upon any particular citizen 
"who has too much to say" and destroy him utterly. In the way 
of an effectual and effective machine for expressing the public 
sentiment of the best minds, I know of nothing equal to the Grand 
Rapids Committee of One Hundred, save possibly the Canadian 
Club of Vancouver." 

ELBERT lUBBARD. 
D 

"Grand Rapids is a bad town for a man with a grouch. Every 
man in Grand Rapids is on his job. and most every man is on two jobs. 
The houses breathe an air of culture and prosperity and the stores 
are filled chockablock with up-to-date goods. Reliable and con- 
servative newspapers, fine churches, including a Polish edifice with 
a dome on it like the Massachusetts State House, an aristocratic 
and yet home-like club, and biggest and best of all, multitudes of 
factories filled with busy and contented workmen, conspire to 
answer the question: Why is Grand Rapids?" 

WORCESTER (MASS.) MAGAZINE. 



"To bring about this oneness was the work of several and 
persistent men. Heber A. Knott is President of the Board of 
Trade, and he is a type of the new kind of man — a man who never 
lets anything go by default. The Secretary is C. A. Cotton, 
another man of quite the same type. Millard Palmer is Chairman 
of the Committee of One Hundred, and Millard is a man who 
might be killed, hut who can not be bought, bribed or intimidated. 
You see it is a vigilance committee, organized in a time of peace, 
and working for beauty, truth and justice and the rights of even 
its most obscure citizen." 

THE FRA. 
D 

"Allow me to congratulate you and your Board on this re- 
port, and to say that my experience as President of our Board of 
Trade convinces me that your method is without a doubt the best 
now in vogue in any commercial organization in the country,'* 

F. C. BOWYER, President Tampa Board of Trade. 

n 

"The Directors of the Grand Rapids Boanl of Trade have 
arranged a Speakers' Bureau, for the purpose of supplying speakers 
on commercial and civic development topics to organizations de- 
siring the services of such speakers." 

ROCHESTER "COMMERCE." 



"I have looked over the "Inventory of Results" and cer- 
tainly must congratulate your organization and its Secretary upon 
its accomplishments for the past year He told us some- 
thing of your splendid organization, from which I infer that the 
city is to be congratulated upon the character and nature of the 
work which you are doing." 

ABNER E. LARNED, 
President Detroit Board of Commerce. 

n 

"Indifference has been made a disgrace, co-operation is a 
vogue." FUX ELBERTIS. 

D 

"Permit me to thank yon for the 1909 report of >'our or- 
ganization, which shows splendid effort on the part of the "cor- 
poration" as well as on the part of its Secretary. It is further 
evidence of what can be done by co-operation along the right lines.' 
GEORGE DIETRICH. President Rochester Chamber of 
Commerce. 



"I have carefully read the article written by Elbert Hubbard 
and have the paper on my table to read it over again. It is very 
good indeed, and I feel you ought to be proud of it." 

J. L. HUDSON. Detroit. 
D 

"We have received a copy of your annual report and ex- 
pect to say something about this in our March number, and would 
be glad, if you could do so without inconvenience, if you would 

send us in order that we may use it in connection with 

our reference to the splendid work of your organization." 
LEWIS D. SAMPSON, 
Editor Town Development Magazine, Chicago. 

D 

"I congratulate you on the active organization which you 

C. ALFRED BURHORN, Secretary Hoboken 
Board of Trade, Hoboken, (New Jersey). 



have.' 



"I am in receipt of your pamphlet recording the doings of 
the Grand Rapids Board of Trade for 1909, and I want to con- 
gratulate both the organization and yourself for the work ac- 
complished. It is really a wonderful record, and I am especially 
interested in one or two things which you succeeded in placing 
the 'Things Done" column." 

W. M. NIXDORF. Secretary Lancaster Board of Trad.- 

n 

"A yearly booklet issued for 1909 by your Board of Trade 
was loaned me by a business man here who was a recent visitor 
to your city, by which booklet your city shows a remarkably suc- 
cessful work, the inspiration from which might help our city." 
A. B. McCOLL, A. B. McColl & Co.. Toronto, Ontario. 

n 

"I can see at a glance that Grand Rapids has certainly 
been going some during the past year, and congratulate you upun 
your very great successes." 

CHARLES J. BROWN. President Brown Brothers Co.. 
Rochester. (New York). 



"It is credit to yourself, and, 



such. 



credit to your 



J. SOLEY COLE, Secretary Utica Chamber of Commerce 

Utica. (New York) 

D 

"I have already glanced through the very attractive printed 
statement of what is going on at the (Jrand Rapids Board of Trade. 
I will confess it stirred my old-tiuie pride in the Imperial City 
which is on Grand River." 

JAMES JAY SHERIDAN. Former President of the 

Hamilton Club, Chicago. 

o 

"I have had a copy of your annual report, telling what has 
been done during the current year by the Grand Rapids Board of 
Trade. If you have a few extra copies Mr. Filene would ap- 
preciate the favor if you would send them on." 

RAYMOND E. BELL. Secretary to President 
EDWARD A. FILENE of Boston— 1915. 



i6 




CENTRA, 



SCHoot 




Ph.ito l.y Royul Photo (_ ... 



NKW POSTOFFICK 



17 



^viti Historp of #ranb 3^apibs 




By MH. LEWIS G. STUART 

|||P^li|||UAND RAPIDS, the metropolis of Western Michigan, dates from Sunday, June iS. 
'^^Tjjj 1S33 when Joel (iuild, the first settler arrived with his family, coming from Ionia 
toJiP lI down the river in the liateaux which Louis Campau sent for them. 
SliiP'r ' Guild was a memlier of the Dexter colony of ();3 persons who left Herkimer 

County, N. Y. in the spring and came to Michigan by way of the Erie canal and 
across Lake Erie to Detroit, thence through the woods to Ionia where most of them 
located. 

Prior to the coming of the first settlers the Baptists had a mission here for the 
^\ \ Indians, established in 18''25. 

Louis Campau had a trading station on the rapids, Wm. Marsac had a station 
at Lowell, Rix Robinson one at Ada and there were traders at Grand Haven. 

Following Guild's arrival settlers came in rapidly. 

In 1838 Grand Rapids was incorporated as a village and the boundaries were Fulton, 
Division and Hastings streets and the river. 

The population was less than 1000. 

The entire state then had only about 175,000 po])ulation. 

In 1850 the village became a city with a population of '2080 as shown Ijy the census. 

The first railroad, the Grand Trunk, reached here in 1858. 

Prior to that the stage coaches and river steamers were the only modes of travel. 

Grand Rapids sent its full quota to the war and in the year that followed it had its 
period of prosperity and its setbacks, its disaster and its progress just as other cities have, 
but through all the city grew steadily and rapidly, every year adding to its population and 
resources. 

In 1870, twenty years after its incorporation. Grand Rapids had a census i)opulation 
of 10,507; in 1890, twenty years later, this had grown to 64,147. 

The United States census of 1910 gives Grand Rapids a ])0])ulation of ll'-2,571. This 
does not include East Grand Rapids, Burton Heights and Wyoming Districts, North Park or 
the well settled suburb in Walker, all directly tributary to the city and as much a part of 
it socially, industrially and in a business way as though within the city lines. With its 
environs Grand Rajjids has 1'25,000 population, and 25,000 more may be added if the ])eople 
who are within half an hour's ride by interurlian or rail be counted. 

The city's area is 17.5 sciuare miles and so closely have the sulnirljs been built up that 
the ilividing line between city and country can scarcely be detected. 

The Grand Rapids of to-day is a modern city with beautiful homes as its ])ride and bu.sy 
industries as its boast. 

It owns its own water works, its own lighting ])lant, its own market |)lace for the farmers, 
has a city hall that cost $;?00,00(l. a county court house that cost $••250, ()()(• and the new i)Ost 
office which will be com])leted this summer at a cost of $500,000. 

It has a detention hospital, a contagious disease hospital and a tuberculosis sanatorium 
as public institutions, besides three hospitals, three homes and two orjjhanages conducted by 
private and church enterprise. 

When the new school year opens the city will have two complete high schools with man- 
ual training de))artments and the site ])Mrchased for a third high school to l)c built in the 
South end when needed. 

The school property represents an investment of $2,000,000. 

The public library, a gift to the city of his birth by Martin A. Ryerson, cost $300,000, 
contains 112,110 volumes and has seven branches in different parts of the city. 



i8 




riiolo li.v Royal I'hoto Co. 



19 



The city nuiseum, rich in its natural history collections, cost for real estate alone $30,000. 

The park and playground system comprises 218 acres and in addition to the public 
parks are the popular resorts at Reeds Lake and North Park and resorts of Lake Michigan 
are only an hour away by interurban. 

The city has churches of every denomination with property valued at over 
$2,000,000.00. 

The Catholics have a seminary here for the education of young men for the priesthood, 
the churches of the Reformed denomination have their college in this city. 

Grand Rapids has 90 cent gas, the cheapest electric power of any city in the country, 
with the current brought here from the Muskegon river 80 miles away, and a street railway 
system of 60 miles. 

The ])ublic utilities are so well managed that the companies and the city are on freindly 
terms, the companies always willing to co-operate in whatever may be to the city's advantage. 

The Michigan State Telephone Co. and the Citizens' have between them upwards of 
15,000 subscribers and long distance lines extend in every direction. 

The first industry established in Grand Rajjids by the pioneers after the saw mill was a 
planing mill. 

The manufacture of furniture began in 1848 and Grand Rapids to-day is the recog- 
nized center of the industry in this country for high grade goods. 

There are 46 furniture factories here (strictly speaking) with an annual product 
estimated in value at $10,000,000. 

The semi-annual season openings in July and January attract 1,000 to 1,400 buyers 
from^ every state in the union and from foreign lands. 

To bring their wares to the attention of the buyers, between 300 and 400 manufacturers, 
with plants in other cities, send their samples here. 

Five of the largest buildings in the city are used exclusively for furniture exhibition 
purposes. 

Though furniture manufacturing is the chief industry. Grand Rapids is not by any 
means an one-industry town. 

It has 88 metal working concerns, 33 machine shops, 32 clothing and shoe factories, 
50 printing offices, several of them with l)ig })uildings of their own, 19 laundries with trade 
covering Western Michigan, one paper mill, 7 tanneries, 15 flour and feed mills and many minor 
industries. 

This city is the largest producing point in the world of gypsum products, with eight mills, 
and supi)lies the world with sticky fly paper and carpet sweepers. 

The city has four national banks, five state lianks and one trust company, with a com- 
bined capital of $3,475,000 and total deposits of $28,700,000. 

The deposits increased last year $1,600,000 which may be regarded as an index to the 
city's prosperity and thrift. 

In all the history of Grand Rapids covering three fourths of a century there never has 
been a bank failure here and in the panic of 1907 when the banks in other cities were resorting 
to clearing house certificates or demanding notices from depositors the Ijanks here met all 
demands with cash. 

The city's assessed valuation is $85,324,000. 

Its assets including parks, schools, public buildings, water works and other propertj^ 
inventorv at $6,298, 861. 



20 




KENT SCIE.VTIKIC MISEIM 
RVERSON PI BI.IC LIBRARY 



21 



Its bonded indebtedness is only $3,575,300 of which $1, '237,000 is on the water works, 
$528,000 for school purposes, $«43.'-20() special assessments and $000,000 for other purposes. 

As an ott'set the sinking fund contains over $300,000 to meet bonds when due. 

Grand Rapids is the jobbing center of western Michigan with nearly every line of trade 
represented by houses of am])]e resources. 

It is the retail center with the largest stores and best stocks in the state. 

It is the center of the famous Michigan fruit belt and the largest i)eacli market in the 
world. 

Grand Rapids has its fraternal organizations of all kinds; its Woman's clubs, four of 
them owning club houses of their own. its social organizations, its board of trade with 1400 
members, and its committee of one hundred and municipal affairs committee. 

The city is in the best sense democratic, cordial to those who come here to live and 
hos])itable to the stranger. 

It has wealth but not snobbishness, it has no slum district, its strength is in the high 
average of the middle classes. 

The history of Grand Rapids from trading post to village, from village to city, from 
small town to metropolis is written in the lives of men and women who are still active in 
the world's affairs. 

A single life more than spans all that has been achieved. 

The city's growth has been steady anil sure with solid foundations laid for every advance. 

And this growth will continue and it will be growth not only in material things but in 
those things that make a city desirable as a dwelling place for men and their families. 




MICHIGAN SOLDIERS' HOME 



22 





3nbu£»trial (Opportunities! 

By MR. WILLIAM H. GILBERT 

'NDUSTRIAL STATISTICS may show a part, hut they cannot show all that 
Grand Rapids offers for the manufacturer who is seeking a location. First and 
best, Grand Rapids will share with the manufacturer who locates here, the spirit 
of success. This spirit of success, intangible and indescribable, is a commixture of 
confidence, perseverance, and a willingness to win by any amount of hard work, 
but under no conditions of ease to fail. 

To manufacture in our City is to build up your industry ajiart from the 
spirit of failure, lack of confidence and faltering. Our industries here are soundly 
built, firmly propped by the financial resources of our City, and the spirit which 
such industries engender is the spirit which we offer, as we offer the air we 
breathe, to the manufacturer who seeks it and deserves it. 

Living conditions is a subject which always has been and always will be indigestible for 
the statistician. For Grand Rapids we can say that we have reason to believe that one can 
live as well for less money here than in any other city, or what is the same thing, can live better 
for the same money. As to essentials, real estate values are low, our five lines of railroads so 
radiate as to spread our industrial area over a large teriitory with a consequent freedom from 
congestion and excellent land values for the purchaser. This means large accessible areas at 
reasonable prices for factory sites and the homes of working men, and the large percentage 
(probably sixty per cent) of working men owning their homes, attest their appreciation of this 
opportunity. Food stuffs are low. Without resorting to tables we can point to the proximity 
(one hundred eight miles by water) of Chicago, the meat market of the country; to the rich 
farming country surrounding our City; and to the greatest potato shipping district in the 
United States just to the north of us, as evidence of the reasonable prices of our staples. 

The cost of living is reflected in wage cost. Our actual wage, that is. what the econo- 
mists call the purchasing power of a day's work, is large; while the cash wage is not so high in 
comparison with other points. Carfares but rarely enter into the workingmen's expenses; 
parks, free museums and libraries afford a considerable part of his entertainment, and these 
facts coupled with the low cost of food stuff's place within reach of the workingmen in our City 
a plane of living far beyond that of many of his fellow craftsmen in other cities who are receiving 
a higher cash wage. 

Labor troubles here are unknown. Our City is a manufacturing City; it lives and 
thrives upon the diligence and loyalty of its workingmen; and our manufacturers, many of 
them graduated themselves from the bench, are well aware of their obligation to the men in 
the shop. The reasonable desires of the men as to wages, shop conditions, homes, etc., have 
been met, even anticipated by these men who hold before all else the loyalty of their working 
force; with the result that, without walking delegates, business agents, strikes or boycotts. 
Grand Rapitls has for five years kej^t ()ace with the prominent industrial centers of the country 
in recognition of the American workingman's increasing requirements and rights. This has 
been brought about without antagonism or ill will — just an honest balancing of a day's work 
against an adequate compensation. 

The best proof of the possibilities of success here are the factories already established, 
uniformly prosperous and increasing. The last report of the Commissioner of Labor, 1910, 
showed in Grand Rapids for the year !!)()!), ,508 sho})s and factories employing '■2'-2, "238 hands, of 
which number 18,13^2 were male adults, 3,786 female adults, '213 boys and 107 girls. There 
has been maintained without difficulty a constant adequate supply of skilled factory hands, 
and we feel certain that our city will ])rove as resnurceful in this regard in the future as it 
has in the past. 



24 




....--^^-^^"' 



n-oP.'« 




ONE OF SEVEN ENORMOUS FURNITURE EXHIBITION BUILDINGS Phol,.s hv Royal Pliolo Co. 



Transportation, and banking facilities are elsewhere discussed. The question of 
power, so important to all industries finds a ready answer here. The great Croton Dam of 
the Grand Rapids-Muskegon Power Company, coupled with their steam auxiliary plant for 
producing current, furnishes the City with this ideal motive force whicli has made Grand 
Rapids the largest per capita user of current for industrial purposes in the United States. 
Complete rate tables of this Company which cannot be here inserted are more convincing than 
any bare statement could ever be. For the benefit of those who prefer steam power we are 
able to state that the rate of freight on coal to Grand Rapids from the Ohio, West Vir- 
ginia and Pennsylvania coal fields is on a par with the rate to Chicago. This is true on both 
bituminous and anthracite coal. The price at the mine is standard and from this statement 
it will not be difScult for any manufacturer to reckon the price of his coal in Grand Rapids. 
We can say further that we are witliin one hundred and thirty-five miles, short mileage, of 
extensive coal fields in Bay City and Saginaw in Michigan. A large amount of coal from these 
fields is used in Grand Rapids, the freight rate being only sixty cents per ton. 



Ranking 



Bv MR. CL.\Y H. HOLLISTER 




HE BANKS of Grantl Ra])ids have always been able to take care of the needs of 

Tthe community and, not only that, they have served the Western part of Michigan 
in a very generous way. There never has been a failure of a Grand Rapids bank 
except a small private institution years ago. The character of the men in the business 
has always been of the best and great emphasis has been placed upon safe-guarding 
the moneys entrusted to them, and in caring for the needs of young and growing 
business. The development from pioneer banking in the community of little 
capital to the larger financiering when depositors and borrowers have more capital 
and their needs are more complicated, has been carefully followed and our bankers 
to-day are as well posted in the modern methods of handling accounts as any in the 
Country. 

Our banks are willing to assist generously in any undertakings that are safe and legiti- 
mate and to loan money to honest men who can by its use add to the profits of their active 
business. Oftentimes home customers have been served when it was more profitable to do 
business outside. 

The banking capital of the City at the last report was .$5,()(J(),(I()() and the deposits at 
the .same time $'28,700,000, a total of almost $35,000,000 available for l)uilding up the com- 
munity. There are four National Banks, five State and Savings Banks and one Trust Com- 
pany. Every legitimate borrowing need of merchant, manufacturer or investor is served and 
on the other hand every safeguard for the holding sacred of depositors' money is used. The 
offices used are modern and u])-to-date, attractive to both men and women, equipped with 
committee rooms, rest rooms, and all modern devices for expediting work. Several have 
lunch rooms for employees, insuring a quiet, warm meal for the clerk and better health and 
eflBciency in service. 

The banks are all Members of the Grand Rapids Clearing House Association. This 
Organization has been valuable in its way. It .serves the individual bank by making possible 
a simple exchange of vouchers against other banks. It affords opportunity for consultation 
on matters of common interest and in times of financial stress in the country at large, it has 
stood as a bulwark of strength for all legitinuite business. 



26 




A C^■^ OK IIOMKS 



27 



^ Citp of llomcs 




By MR. JOHN IHLDER 

'VERY eiiterprisingcity has a strong point upon which it prides itself. The point upon 
^^ whicii (irand Rapids most prides itself is that it is a good place in which to live. 
Large enough to draw such metro])olitan attractions as the best plays and music, 
annual exhil)itions of the American Water Color Society, annual gatherings at its 
Lincoln Day banquet of the most prominent men in the country, it is still small 
enough to permit of home life. 

Even the workers in the factories own the houses in which they live, houses 
surrounded by little plots of grass and fronting on cool, tree shaded streets. Due 
to this is the general spirit of neighhorliness and good fellowship which makes the 
newcomer feel welcome, the old resident realize that no other town can ever 
be home to him. 

This home spirit permeates every pha.se of Grand Rapids life, institutions which make 
living here more full and satisfying are loyally supported. The Public Library and its branches 
send books into almost as many homes as call upon the gas company for enlightenment: the 
appeal for a park and playground .system which will serve every part of the city, putting whole- 
some recreation facilities within easy reach of evevy child, has met with a generous response, 
and in all parts of town, city and neighborhood playgrounds are being established, while well-to- 
do citizens are giving park lands as tokens of their affection for their community. 

The ])n)i)osal to sujjply pure water to the people was endorsed last spring by a great 
majority and work is now well under way. These are indications of the spirit which prevails. 
Grand Rapids is a place in which it is good to live, and so thoroughly do its people 
appreciate their advantages that they let slip no opportunity to increase them. Each Arbor 
Day the ]Muni(ii)al AflFairs Committee distributes at cost price to school children and factory 
workers thousands of trees and shrubs which adii to the attractiveness of the smaller homes. 
The wealthier citizens take pride in the wide lawns which surround their homes. 

Instead of having only one fine residenc'e street, within half a block of which on either 
side are shabby, unkemjjt areas. Grand Rapitis has whole districts where the visitor may wander 
in any direction without finding a single spot that strikes a discordant note in the general 
imjjression of space and comfort and peace. 

North, along (Jrand River, new suburbs arc springing up wliicii otter their people the 
pleasures of bathing and boating combined with the ])in-e air and wide views of the hills. In 
the east end. about Reed and Fisk lakes, an e\en finer residence district is rapidly being created. 
Here are some of the handsomest homes in the City, large, spacious houses set in the midst of 
acres of lawns and flower gardens, aflording vistas of the hill-encircled waters of the lakes. 
Two years ago the people of Grand Rai)ids awoke to a realization that the ra]iid growth 
of the City threatened to deprive them of many of these advantages unless that growth was 
wisely directed. So they appointed a City i)hni commission, which, with the aid of two of the 
most experienced City ])lanners in America. prei)ared a report showing how the town should be 
develojjed. This report deals first with the Tiecds of business, indicating how tho.se needs may 
best be met. but it also shows what lands should be reserved for parks .so that no matter how 
large the city may become its ])eoi)le will always have a space for health and jileasure. The 
wide stretches of level land, through whicli run the railroads, are the natural area for tlie com- 
mercial and industrial expansion of the future, the hills aft'ord wholesome and ])leasant sites for 
the homes of a constantly increasing jiopulation. the creek valleys, the lake shores and the hill- 
sides are the parks provided by nature for the recreation of an industrious and prosjierous people. 



28 



SOLDIERS AND 

SAILORS 

MONUMENT 




TRAIN SlIEnS AT UNION STATION 
ENTRANCE TO UNION STATION 




transportation 

By MR. ROBERT W. IRWIX 

: IVE STEAM railroads, the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway Coni])any, the Pere 
Marquette Raih'oad Company, the Michigan Central Railroad Company, the Lake 
Shore & Michigan Southern Railway Company and the Grand Trunk Railway 
System, and two electric internrban lines, the Grand Ra])ids. Grand Haven & Mus- 
kegon Railway and the Grand Rapids, Holland & Chicago Railway, radiate from 
Grand Rapids. The two electric interurban lines mentioned operate in connection 
with Trans-Lake Michigan boat lines to Chicago, and other important ports on the 
west shore of the Lake. Grand Rapids is the division terminus of several branches 
of each of the steam roads mentioned. 

Through trains, on fast freight schedules, move each day on all lines between 
Grand Rapids and all important junction points of interchange, thus providing through fast 
freight service for carload shipments of every description in every direction. Many of these 
trains are maintained to handle enormous volume of perishable and other high class freight 
originating at Grand Rapids and are operated on passenger train schedules. The wholesale 
and manufacturing shipping interests of Grand Rapids are advantageously served by through 
merchandise cars that are operated on a daily schedule by all of the steam railroads, affording 
first and second morning delivery to all cities and important towns within a raduis of 500 
miles. Daily through merchandise cars are also operated between Grand Rapids and New 
York City, Boston, and many other points. More than 150 scheduled merchandise cars are 
forwarded from Grand Rapids daily. 

Shipments to and from Chicago, via the Interurbans and Boat lines, are ready for de- 
livery the next morning, thus affording express service at regular freight rates. 

The Pere Marquette Railroad Company and the Grand Trunk Railway System oper- 
ate from Grand Rapids in connection with Trans-Lake Michigan Car Ferries to Milwaukee, 
Manitowoc, Wisconsin and other Lake Michigan ports, affording a connecting link with the 
Trunk Lines radiating throughout the West and Northwest via which routes carload ship- 
ments move without breaking bulk. 

Excellent service is maintained to the North and Northwest by the way of Mackinaw 
and the St. Paul and Minneapolis gateway, via the Grand Rapids & Indiana Railway and the 
Soo Line. 

Each railroad comjiany maintains and operates its own terminals in Grand Rapids, 
thus affording an unlimited choice of factory and warehouse sites with low switching rates 
and dependable service. 

So called trap cars are operated between the factories in the outlying districts and the 
central freight houses. These cars are loaded at factory platforms to their capacity with less 
than carload shipments, and are then switched to the freight houses for distribution into the 
outgoing merchandise cars previously described. This service and the fact that the freight 
hou.ses of the various lines are well distributed throughout the wholesale and manufacturing 
districts, reduces cartage costs to the minimum and as the various freight houses are so operated 
as to insure the forwarding of merchandise shipments same day as received, less than carload 
shipments from Grand Rapids enjoy practically carload service. 

Excellent team track and platform facilities for the loading and unloading of carload 
shipments are maintained by all of the railroads in various portions of the manufacturing and 
wholesale district. There is in Grand Rapids no congestion of team tracks, yards or freight 
houses because of the excellent facilities provided by the railroads. Deliveries to team track, 



30 




SCENES IN VARIOUS PARKS 



31 



factory or ware house of carload shipments arriving at Grand Rapids and deHveries to out- 
bound trains and freight houses of shipments forwarded from Grand Rapids, are uniforndy 
made without dehiy. 

Passenger travel to and from Grand Rapids is luxuriously served by through chair, 
dining, parlor and sleeping oars operate<l between Grand Rapids and all ini]jortant ])oints 
east, south and west, and via all lines. During the summer season passenger travel facilities 
and accommodations are generously increased by the railroads for the benefit of the immense 
traffic moving to and from the justly famous pleasure resorts of Michigan. 

No other city in the United States is alile to offer to the wholesale or retail merchant 
or to the manufacturer or jolilier, better transportation facilities and service. 



^ (§tmt l^orticulural Center 

Hy MR. CII.\RLES W. G.VRFIELD 

HE CRADLE of Grand Rapids Horticulture was a canoe drawn u|) from the river 
bank into the door yard of Uncle Louis Cami^au's ])rimitive residence, in which were 
started the plants that made his first garden. The first fruits were wild strawberries, 
currants, gooseberries, raspberries, blackberries, plums, grapes and crab apples 
gathered from the river bottom and open places in the forest. Fruit trees were 
grown by Mr. Abel Page from seeds of fruits that were imported from the East, 
time before any fruits were exported. Possibly the first shipment of 
was made by Thomas Wilde who sent them to ^Milwaukee by the 
river and lake boats. Mr. Sherman Pearsall took apples by wagon to Muskegon 
from one of the first commercial orchards. Peaches were grown on Burton Farm, 
before there were any transportation facilities, in considerable amount, and the settlers came 
and helped themselves as there was no sale for the product. 

John Suttle was the pioneer farmer under glass. His greenhouse was at the entrance of 
Fulton Street Cemetery. Wm. Rowe, Elwood Graham, AVm. N. Cook and a few others were 
the pioneers who exhibited the products of our orchards in the outside cities soon after the 
Civil War and brought our locality into prominence as a fruit growing center. Notable ex- 
hibits were made at Boston, Philadelphia, Rochester, St. Louis and New Orleans. The State 
Horticultural Society which has done so much for ^Michigan fruit growing, was organized in 
1870 and fostered by this locality for some years. In 1874 the Grand River Valley Horticul- 
tural Society was formed here which carries the unique record of holding continuous monthly 
meetings for 36 years. The Grand Rapids Fruit Growers Association became a commercial 
necessity and it originated the movement which attracted buyers to this city and made our 
peach market the best in the entire country. The notoriety thus given our city is akin to 
the name created by our furniture industry. 

We are on the threshold of a far greater development in horticulture. We have learned 
the most approved methods of culture, pruning, s])raying and marketing. Capital is seeking 
investment in horticultural undertakings and Grand Rapids is the gateway to the most favored 
fruit region in America. Li our nearness to great markets, and with the favoring conditions 
of climate produced by our fostering mother. Lake Michigan, there is no more promising field 
of commercial industry than that re|)resenting the various branches of horticulture. 




'^'j3l^* It was a long ti 
I F~^^ of strawl)erries 
/ I river and lake 1 



2>2 





TABLES SET FOR 2,400 C()l NTRV MERCHANTS 
G. R. WHOLESALE DEALERS 



I KSIS OK 



33 



^s! a W\)<ikMt ilarket 



By MR. WALTER K. PLUMB 




HE GROWTH of Grand Rapids as a Jobbing Center, emphatically places us second 
to no city of like size in the entire country. As the Metropolis of Western 
Michigan, situated in the fertile, productive, Grand River Valley, our natural 
advantages are unsurpassed. These, augmented by most excellent transportation 
facilities, — railroads extending to all points of the compass, — electric lines with 
express service at freight rates, connecting with the Great Lake Boats, permits 
our Jobbers to serve the Trade throughout Michigan in an extra-prompt and 
efficient manner. 

To the indomitable Pluck, Energy, and Enterprise of our business men, early 
fired with the determination to make this the Jobbing Center of our State, the 
products of our own factories, together with the best of others. Domestic and Foreign, are 
available in this market at all times for the Retail buyer, who finds among our diversified 
Jobbing lines up-to-date quality and profit possibility goods making him a permanent cus- 
tomer and friend. 

It is a matter of business record that our local Jobbers enjoy the greatest possible per- 
centage of perpetual accounts. A marked testimonial of Quality, Service and Goods. 

Through our Wholesale Dealers' Committee of the Grand Rapids Board of Trade, con- 
vincing publicity has been given to the foregoing: supplementing the message of the traveling 
salesman by annual Fall Extended Trade Excursions, the heads of Jobbing Houses have called 
on the merchants throughout a goodly portion of Michigan and Northern Indiana, and meeting 
these retailers in a friendly way in their respective business homes has made the ties of 
Friendship more secure and established more cordial business relations. 

The favor with which the Retailer views Merchants' Week each year is evident by its 
growth; in 11100 the attendance was about 450; last year, nearly .SOOO ])nyers and merchants 
participated in this event. Not satisfied with first entertaining tlie retail merchant and then 
paying him a return visit, this live Association has in vogue perpetual Half fare Excursions 
every business day of the year, — in fact, — has done and is doing, much to acquaint the buying 
public that Grand Rapids is "The best Market." 

The relations between our Wholesale Houses and the local retailers is of equal standing. 
With a broad opportunity of selection, — the cream offering of the market, — ])rompt deliveries 
and courteous treatment — our home merchants have no occasion to go outside. 

In ;55 years, from less than a score of Houses doing Jobbing business, we have grown to 
over 150. It is conservatively estimated that the annual business of our Jobbers now exceeds 
$40,000,000. The supremacy thus attained is just the beginning of the brightest future for our 
fair Jobbing City; a City of Men with Faith in her future, and the Courage of their Faith — and 
therefore A City of Enterprise — Progress and Prosperity. 



34 




VV M^*** 




BLUE RIBBON DAY AT WEST MICIlUiAN STATE FAIR 



35 



iHarfect #artiening anb ^robuce 



Hy MR. HENRY J. VI.NKEMULDER 




■TS A PRODUCE market, and the center of a great anil profitable market gardening- 
region, "unexcelled" is a very conservative term to apjjly to Grand Ra])ids. 

Among the first people to truly recognize and a])preciate the soil and other con- 
ditions here for the growing of garden truck and fruits were the Holland people. 
The science of growing vegetables and flowers is a distinct part of their nature. 
How to produce the best stuff from Mother Earth is their gift, both by inheritance 
and education. For centuries the Netherlands has been known as the flower bed 
and garden spot of Euro]X', and many of the men who came here from there a few 
years ago have become rich through applying the one great science to the earth they 
procured so cheaply. Not only do these people make a good living and acquire a 
competence from the jjroducts of the soil, but while doing this their farm lands increase in 
value steadily. I know instances where lands were bought for from $1.25 to $5.00 per acre, 
that cannot be bought to-day for from $300.00 to $400.00 per acre, and I have a personal knowl- 
edge of crops grown in a single year which have netted more than 10 per cent on a valuation of 
$1000.00 per acre. 

The Savings Bank deposit figures will prove the above partially, but only partially, for 
one glance at the excellent homes lived in by the men who rai.se all this garden truck, their 
holdings in real estate and other investments, shows the good purposes to which the balance of 
the profits have been jnit. 

The shipment of fresh vegetables out of Grand Rajjids is continual the year round. 
The growing of the crops never stops, whether the plants be growing out in the air or under the 
hundreds of acres of glass, which are erected in the environs. AYhile we may come very near to 
it, we do not as a matter of fact raise bananas, cocoanuts and other tropical eatables in this 
section, but our importations of such products for distribution throughout Michigan — and then 
some — are enormous. Grand Ra])ids is a great produce and fruit market from every stand- 
point, and is known throughout the world as such. 

There are still plenty of good lands to be had at reasonable prices in Kent county, with a 
sure market near by, where products can be disposed of for cash. 

I do not know of a business or occupation that will yield lietter retiu-ns than tilling of 
this soil in a proper and intelligent manner. The investment is not large, the dividends sure, 
the work healthful and fascinating. 

I am only writing of the vegetable industry. There are plenty of lands ada])ted to fruit 
culture and general farming, which are also very profitable. 



36 




ALL SORTS OF FACTORIES 



37 



0m HJmth Snbusitrics! 



By MH. LOUIS A. CORNELIUS 




HE HANDICRAFT, perseverance and hard conscientious work of a few men in the 
early oO's followed by the same qualities coupled with capital, has made the name 
"Grand Rai)ids" and "Real Furnitiu'e" internationally synonymous. We are for- 
tunate that this is so and that for the corner-stone of our various industries we have 
a world recognized staple product. 

For years Detroit has been famous for Stoves, Rochester for Shoes, Water- 
bury for Clocks, and other cities with their corner-stone industry; and yet while the 
original important trade has thrived and increased it might surprise the delver after 
tacts to note the rapid progress of other lines in such cities; likewise our own beauti- 
ful city of furniture fame now has an exhibit of varied industries that is note- 
worthy and constantly increasing. 

The last available statistics show that we have 46 furniture factories, employing 
7,019 men and 173 women. Our other manufacturing industries comprise 393 factories, 
employing 9,804 men and 3, '■241 women. By this is meant only such factories as turn out 
completed marketable products. Rejiair shops, cleaning establishments and factories pro- 
ducing parts or incompleted products are not included in these figures. By adding all 
other institutions known as factories, our total was, six months ago, 508. 

Two hundred thirty-seven different products from Heavy Machinery Castings to Hooks 
and Eyes keep our workmen busy. Some of the most important in alphabetical order being: — 

Brass Goods 

Carpet Sweepers 
Catalogs 
Cigars 
Clothing 

Confectionery 
Flour 

Fly Paper 
Furniture 
. Iron Castings 
Leather 
Machinery 
Paper Boxes 
Typewriters 
Veneers 

]\Iany lines of manufactured product insure steady prosperity, because unusual de- 
mand or depression in any one line does not seriously affect the average labor conditions. It 
behooves us, therefore, to cherish all our various industries and to extend the heartiest and 
most loyal welcome to any worthy manufacturer in any line that may be induced to join us 
and enjoj' the splendid opportunity that presents itself in building a business over a "corner- 
stone" that has well established merited merit. 



38 




UljUi-^1 Uj.li III 




www 



tT'T^J 



KENT COLNTV COl RT HOLSE 
CITY HALL 



39 




ELKS' TEMPLE 

Photo by Royal Photo Co. 




PENINSIILAR CLL'B 



40 




A TYPICAL OFFICE BIILI>IN(; 
BUTTERWORTH HOSPITAL 



41 



INTERIOR MASONIC 
BLUE LODGE 




MASONIC TEMPLE 



Photo by Royal Photo Co 



42 




SIGSBEE STREET SCHOOL 



43 




HOLLAND THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, SCIENTIST 



44 




LADIES' LITERARY 
CLUB HOUSE 



Pholo by Koyal I'lioto Co 



ST. CECILIA CLUB HOUSE 



45 



KENDALL HOME 
FOR NURSES 




BLODGETT HOME 
FOR CHILDREN 



Photos by Royal Photo Co. 



46 




NEW PL M PING STATION 



Photos by Royal Photo Co. 




I'OLICt 111 AIX.ll AKI IKS 



47 




FOUNTAIN STREET BAPTIST CHURCH 



48 




Photos by Koyal Photo Co 



IMMANUEL GERMAN LUTHERAN CHIRCH 



49 




A NEST OF FACTORIES 







50 




IN AND AROUND JOHN BALL PARK 



Photo by Royal Photo Co. 



51 




VIEWS OF BUSINESS SECTION DURING HOME COMING WEEK 



52 




LAKESIDK CIl B 



53 




CAMPAU 
PARK 



OTTAWA BEACH AND JENISON PARK 



54 




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WALLIN 

LEATHER 

COMPANY 



1500 Sides Sole Leather Daily 



Wallin Tannery — Matamorous 

Mill Creek Tannery — Packer Slaughter 

Michigan Tannery — Union 



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57 



Gas Service and 
Appliances 

In Grand Rapids, practically every house is equipped with gas lighting 
and cooking appliances. 

This condition is due not only to the t-conomy, cleanliness, convenience 
and adaptability of gas, but to two other important causes: — 

These are — the very low price of gas — a recent reduction — made voluntarily 
as all reductions have been — placing the price on a sliding scale basis, in cjuanti- 
ties, as low as fifty cents per thousand feet and — the service rendered to consumers 
is second to none in the country. 

The Gas Company not only puts gas for fuel and light well within the 
reach of every city dweller but, what is more important still — it educates the 
people to a knowledge of what is cheapest and best in the line of gas appliances. 

To carry on this idea of education, a force of experts is maintained whose 
duty it is to call on every gas consumer free of expense to the customer, go care- 
fully over every gas appliance, make all adjustments necessary, explain to the user 
how properly and economically to operate his equipment, describe to him what is 
newest and best along gas lines, and advise with him should he be in the market for 
any equipment, to make sure he gets full value for the money he wishes to invest. 

A large and well appointed show room is fully equipped with gas lighting 
fixtures, lights, glassware, ranges, water-heaters, etc., where the company wel- 
comes the public, and well informed and courteous people are alw'ays ready to 
explain unfamiliar appliances and see that orders are promptly and jiroperly 
executed. 

A testing room is also made good use of in the selection of appliances 
handled by the company. Here the various manufacturers' samples are tried out 
and only those which prove to have real worth — such as the company can fully 
guarantee as it does every appliance sold — are purchased for sale to its consumers. 

A liberal credit policy is carried out making it possil)le for everyone to have 
the best gas appliances and enjoy the comforts and conveniences of gas — the 
modern fuel — for both cooking and lighting. 

GAS COMPANY 



Wilmarth Show Case Co. 




W. r. WINCHESTER, President O. R. WILMARTH, Vice President 

O. B. WILMARTH, Secretary and Treasurer L. T. WILMARTH, Director 

C. F. E. LUCE, Sales Manager 

^ Organized twenty-one years ago as the Grand 
Rapids Fixtures Co., the Wihnarth Show Case Co. 
has grown from the employment of 10 workmen to 
the regular use of 200 people. 

^ The new factory, corner Jefferson and Cottage 
Grove Avenues, has 100,000 square feet of space and 
is absolutely modern in all its appointments. 

^ The output of show cases and ver> attractive store 
fixtures is widely distributed over the United States. 



59 




6o 



Muskegon Interurban and Goodrich 
Transit Company 




Fast Freight and Passenger Service between Grand 
Rapids and Chicago operating all the year giving 
shippers benefit of lower rates than all rail 

Freight for points beyond Chicago going into through merchandise 
cars leaving every night for all i)rincipal points in the southeast, 
south, southwest, west and northwest ::: ::: ::: ::: 

The G. R. G. H. & M. Ry. have added a large new freight house to their 
Grand Rapids terminals which assures prompt deliveries and receiving of 
freight. Freight houses located at Oak street and Ellsworth Avenue. 
Goodrich docks foot of Michigan Avenue, Chicago ::: ::: ::: 

Howarfl ' -v— O ^«„ 

/£iiiii^r« \ 




61 



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THK abu\e represents a cut of our new buildins; now in process of construc- 
tion, located at the corner of Commerce and Island streets. This building 
will be lOO \ 135. 7 stories and liasenienl hii;h. of reinforced concrete and steel 
construction and when finished will be one of the finest millinerx- buildings in 
the country. ^ We have been in our present location, 20-26 X. Ui\ision street. 
for 20 years. Our rapidly increasing business has driven us to larger quarters. 
The loyal jjatronage of our man\ luslomers has made this possible. 

CORL, KNOTT & CO., Ltd. 

N. Division St. - - GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



63 



From Hide To Shoe 




Your Walk Through Life Made Easy By Wearing Rouge Rex Shoes 




HIRTH-KRAUSE COMPANY 

Tanners and Shoe Manufacturers, Grand Rapids, Michigan 



64 




Fox Typewriter Co. 



><K:-j^ 






ESTABLISHED 1886 
INCORPORATED 1892 REORGANIZED 1902 





ll.A'/«x,/Vi's fox '/ypcZirilcrCo. 






^ 



nPHE FOX TYPEWRITER CO. was 

established in i886 byW. R. Fux, who 
with one lii'Iper constituted the working 
force. At present the comiiany occupies 
63,328 square feet of workinti space and 
employs 350 men. 



65 



Brought to the Doors- 
Water Power Electricity 




THOl^SANDS upon thuusands of dollars have been spent in the endeavor 
to produce economical Light and Power. It has been brought to the 
doors of Grand Rapids industries and homes at rates more reason- 
able than any other city of its size in the country. 

With this modern agent which is cheai)er than coal always ready to use 
and shut ofif when you do not want it, hundreds of industries are on our 
lines today using nearly 22,000 horse power in motors. 

It is displacing steam plants e\erywhcre — how can it be otherwise.^ The 
advantages are too apparent, as it means money made and saved where 
this economical and mcjst efficient power is used. 

If you are considering a change in location of your plant, look at the 
advantages offered you in (irand Rapids. 

Grand Rapids-Muskegon Power Co. 



47 Monroe Street 



Citz. Phone 4261 



Bell Phone 2477 



66 









Silver Foam 

Export 

Alt Nuernberger Brau 




BREWING CO 



67 







OL^ 



THE FLOUR THE 



IFWIUIIFI 



BEST COO^S USE" 

____-.____- 1000 BARRELS FLOUR 
DAILV CAI'AVl ■ T 100 TONS FEED &MtAL 



68 




The Evening Press 



An independent, daily newspaper, devoted to the interests of the people 
of Western Michigan and a supporter of every movement looking to 
the industrial and commercial supremacy of Grand Rapids. 

The E\ening Press has attained the coveted position among newspapers of the country 
of having a larger local circulation jjer capita of population than any other newspaper in 
the United States. 

It strives alwa\s to be constructive and \et maintains a fearless and independent news 
and editorial policy. It is a newspaper with ideals. It co-operates with every agency that 
seeks to up-build and ad\ance the city. It spends liberally for services and talent to make the 
best possible dail)- newspaper. By this policy it has acheived a place of commanding influence. 










■^-'^ 



THE EVENING PRESS BUILDING 

Designed exclusively for the publication of the Evening Press 
and equipped for welfare work among its 1,200 newsboys. 

57,000 Daily Net Circulation 



69 











ENTRANCE OF 



The Grand Rapids National City Bank 

CORNER MONROE AND OTTAWA STREETS 



Capital Surplus and Profits $1,350,000.00 



Monroe and Ottawa Streets, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Herpolsheimer(3 

West Michigan's Greatest Department Store 



WITH the completion of the new 
10 story addition Grand Rapids 
mav boast of the hrst and only 10 
storv dr\ goods and department store in 
Michigan. The name Herpolsheimer has 
been associated with the dry goods business 
in this citv for the past 40 years and their 
business has steadily increased until they 
are now recognized as one of the leading 
dry goods concerns in the state of Michigan. 

The new addition has among other 
special features an observatory on the roof 
— furnishing a splendid panoramic view of 
the entire city. 

The building contains 6 elevators to 
convey customers to the \arious floors and 
departments. 

40 YEARS 

OF 
PLEASING 

CUSTO- 
MERS AND 
MORE 
WILLING 

AND 

ANXIOUS 

TO PLEASE 

THAN 

EVER 

PUBLIC ( AFE loth FLOOR 




WM. G. HER1\)LSHLLMER 
Senior Member of the Firm 







Among the different lines of 
merchandise carried are 

I )r\ Goods, Silks, Dress Goods. 
Linens, Blankets, Laces. Ril)lK)n>, 
Carpets, Draperies. Coals, Suits, 
Milliner\, Chiklren's antl Lifanls' 
Wear Ladies' F"urnishings, Boys' 
("Iciihing, Men's, \\"omen's and 
Cliildren's Shoes, China, Crocker\ . 
Glassware, Silverware, Housefiir- 
nishings. Art Goods, Pictures. Bas- 
kets. Men's Wear. Men's Hats, 
Stationery, Notions, Trunks, Suit 
Cases, Tra^■eling Bags, Leather 
Goods, Hair Goods, Toilet Goods, 
jiwelrv . Books, Sheet Music, Toys, 
Confectionerw Etc. 



THEN 



.fTTjp^P^^ 





NOW 

From the okl horse car to the 
Cable Road, and then to the 
splendid modern electric 
system of today's con- 
veniences as ex- 
emplified by 
the 





PAY- AS-YOU-ENTE R CAR 



IS 



s tht 



story of 
the de\'elop- 



men 



t of the 



Grand Rapids 
Railway Company, 

which is a part of 
Grand Rapids, and interested in its growth 





TEX YEARS ago we started the 
manufacture of Wood Working 
Machincr\-. The high quality and 
character of our j^roduct ha\e increased 

our business Steadl\' until today we are Main Plant— Corner Coldbrook and Clancy Streets 

known in every ci\ ilized country of this 

globe as one of the foremost manufacturers of iiigh grade wocjd working machinery. X'isit our ])!ant. 









Our injieni'jiis 
and original en- 
gineers, modern 
plant, efficient 
ftictnr>- manage- 
ment and cor- 
rect salesman- 
ship — all com- 
bined — will give 
\ou service and 
value second to 
none. 

Send for 

Catalog 

No. 16 




Machine Floor — Main Buildini^ 



Erecting Floor — Main Buildini^ 



If you use any wood working machinery wiiatsoe\er give us a chance to 
machines — to give you the benefit of our experience. 



tel 



\ou ot our 




Rear of Main Plant 



Distinctly a 20th (\ntiir\ Enterprise. 
Began manufacturing Wood Trimmers in 
1900 in the Rawland Factory on Canal St. 
under the name of .■\mcrican Machinery Co. 

1903 — Moved to Comstock Bldg. on Mill 
St. north of Bridge. 

1904 — .\(klcd more capital and began the 
development of new tools for pal tern making 
purposes. 

1906 — Business expanded to such propor- 
I ions as to demand new and larger quarters. 
Purchased nearly 4 acres of the old "Settling 
IJasin" opposite what is nowCreston Parkand 
erected thereon buildings that give them over 
r>o,ooo square feet of floor space. 

1907 — Jan. igo; incorporated forSiSo.ooo. 

1909 — Increased capital stock to S650.000. 



Oliver Machinery Company, ^-"^^^p^^^ 



Mich., U.S.A. 



P.VIENT WOOD WORKING M.\CHINERY M.\NUF.\CTL RERS 

BR.\NCH OFF1CE.S .\ND .SHOW ROOMS 

NEVVVORK CITY CHIC.\GO. ILL. SE.\TTLE. W.\SH. ST. LOLIS, .M(J. LOS .^XGELES. C.AL. 

SO Church St. First Natl. Bank Bids. Pacific Building .\atl. Bank of Commerce Bids. 1 125 W. Temple St. 



.M.ANXHESTER. ENG. 
JO I -203 Deansgate 



73 




We have, without a doubt, the best equipped 
wholesale fruit and produce house in the country. 
Our facihties are unequaled. Our building has 
every modern convenience --private railroad 
track and driveway running through— centrally 
located in the center of the wholesale district. 

We handle all kinds of foreign and domestic fruits 
and produce. We make a specialty of onions, 
potatoes, apples and cabbage in carload lots. 




31-35 Market St. - - - 46-50 Canipau St. 



74 




75 




The Fourth 
National Bank 

Solicits the accounts of individuals, 
firms and corporations and 
offers them the advan- 
tages of its 

Convenient Location 

Conimodious Offices and 

Ample Facilities 

For transacting all classes of 
banking business 



THERE IS NOTHING IN SAFE BANK- 
ING THAT WE CANNOT PERFORM 

Peoples Savings Bank 

Close of Business Jan. 7, ii)ii 
RESOURCES 

Loans and Discounts % 60O.552.39 

Bonds, Mortgages and Securities . . 1.100,148.84 

Banking House 35.000 00 

Other Real Estate i. 218. 70 

Overdrafts 700,09 

Items in Transit 52.000.48 

Exchanges for Clearing House . . % 5.794-45 
Cash in Vault and Banks . . 347.i23-o8 

352.917.53 

Other Cash Items 223.00 

Total 52,157.761.03 

LIABILITIES 

Capital Stock 
Surplus Fund 
Undivided Profits . 
Dividends Unpaid . 
Commercial Deposits 
Savings Deposits 
Savings Certificates 
Due to Banks and Bankers 
Cashier's Checks . 
Certified Checks 

Total Deposits 



Sioo.ooo.oo 

100,000.00 

8,105.60 



$296,483.31 

682.832.44 

823. 184.80 

145.437-17 

1. 168. 35 

294-30 



Total 



r. 949.400.43 
52.157.761 03 



The Peoples Savings Bank of Grand Rapids, offers all the 
advantages of a safe, strong, conservative yet progressive in- 
stitution. Its resources are sound to the core and its con- 
nections unquestionably the best. 

In addition to savings accounts we solicit and are prepared 
to receive accounts of banks, bankers, corporations and firms 
on favorable terms, and will be pleased to meet or correspond 
\\ith those who contemplate opening new accounts. 
THOMAS HEFFERAN, President WM. ALDEN SMITH. 
Vice President. SAMUEL M. LEMON. Vice President. 
EUGENE D. CONGER. Cashier. T. WM. HEFFERAN, 
Assistant Cashier. 



ommercial 



West Side Office 

40 West Bridge 
Street 



South End 

Branch 

Corner 6th Ave. 

and South 
Division Street 



North West Corner Canal and Lyon Streets 

We are fully equipped to gi\e complete 
service to commercial industries and also 
specialize in the courteous handling of 
savings accounts. Our aim is to make our 
friends and customers feel at home when 
banking with the COMMERCIAL. 

Capital $200,000 
Deposits over $2,000,000 



76 



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77 



Klingman's Sample 
Furniture Company 

The largest exclusive retailers of Fur- 
niture in America. 

We guarantee you a saving. 

Visitors always welcome. 

The most interesting show place in 
Grand Rapids. 

Corner Ionia, Fountain and Division Streets 





Mueller 
& Slack 
Company 



Manufactur- 
ers of 

Upholstered 
Furniture 



ESTABLISHED 
1892 



'r'.UEl.LER 



• r 



(f^i 




• iitlli 







<^ 



tOKXEK CANAL AND TKOWBRIDGE STREETS 



The "Bertsch" Shoe for Men 

Herold-Bertsch Shoe Co. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Grand Rapids, Michigan, U. S. A. 






MICHIGAN'S FOREMOST CHAIR FACTORY 




Michigan Chair Company 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 



79 





Iiiiiiii4. 



FACTORY AND OFFICES OF THE 

GRAND RAPIDS HARDWARE COMPANY 

THE LARGEST MAKERS OF ALL-STEEL SASH PULLEYS IN THE WORLD 



THE Cleaning Device for Every Home- 

BISSELL'S "Cyco" BALL BEARING Carpet Sweeper 





ahvays ready; no burden 
that is offered at a price 



Weighs but S\ pounds, operates by a mere touch, cleans 
thoroughly without injury to carpets or rugs; raises no dust, 
to carry from room to room; is the only efficient cleaning apparatus 
within the purchasing power of the masses. 



I 



BIS SELL'S 



BALL BEARING 
Carpet Sweeper 



excels all other cleaning // devices in the work it does in the 
sewing room, dining // room, or wherever there is a mis- 

;athor up. The "Bisfcll" picks up 

cleaners cannot gather, such as lint, 

threads, ravelings, scraps of paper and 

"Bissell" gives the iiKixiiiiiim sweeping 

cost. 



cellaneous lot of litter to 
without effort what other 
large crumbs, matches, 
cloth, etc., etc. The 
ef/icifMcj' <if the miiiiiinim 

PRICES 

$2.75 to $5.75 

'P 




The laigcbt carpet ttweeper factory lu the world. 




FOR S.\LE BY DEALERS EVERYWHERE 

BISSELL CARPET SWEEPER CO., 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

(Largest and Only Exclusive Carpet Swei'per Makers in Ihe World.) 



8o 



Daily Ci)e ^eralb Sunday 



CLEAN AND CONSERVATIVE 
POPULAR AND PROGRESSIVE 

The only Morning and the only Sunday Newspaper in a 
City of 112,000 and a Section of 500,000 

Proven Circulation for the Advertiser 



A. H. VANDENBERG, Publisher 
HERALD SQUARE 




NELSON-MATTER FLRNniRK COMPAWS FACTORY, 
OFFICE AM) DISPLAY ROOMS 



81 





THE BEST FLY PAPER 



MANUFACTURED BYl 



Grand Rapids 
Sticky Fly Paper Co. 

ALBERT G. DICKINSON, Prop. 

GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



ROBINSON & CAMPAU 



ARCHITHCTS 



449-452 Houseman Bldg. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 



Erected From Our Drawings and Specifications 



GRAND RAPIDS 



New Central High Selmi)! 
Union High School 
Sigsbee School 
Murray Building 
Manufacturers Building 
New Steketee Building 
Herpolsheimer Buildings 
Furniture Exhibition ISnihling 
Berteh Building 

Heystek & Canfiehl. Warehouse 
Hop.s(ui Building 
Judson Grocery Co. 



Worden (irocery Co. 
G. R. Refrigerator Factory 
National Candy Co. Factory 
Dean-Hicks Printing Co. 
Globe Knitting Works 
Powers & Walker Casket Co. 
Luce Furniture Co. 
Wolverine Brass Works 
G. R. Paper Box Co 
G. R. Foundry Co. 
Sintz-Wallin Co., Foundry 



MUSKEGON 

Brunswick-Balke-Collandcr Co. 
Hume Grocery Co. 
Continental Motor Mfg. Co. 
Muskegon Savings Bank 
National Lumberman's Bank 
Home for the .\ged 

ROCKFORD 

Hirth. Krause & Co., Shoe Factory 
Hirth, Krause & Co., Tannery 



82 




The largest fac- 
tory in the Unit- 
ed States devot- 
ed exclusively to 
the manufacture 
of Tables. 



F. STUART FOOTE. 
Sec'y and Treas. 



Imperial Furniture Company 

We are a young firm. ha\ing been in existence but six years, but in that time we have 
established such a business that we are compelled to build a large addition which will 
increase our output by one-third. 

The whole resources of this large plant arc spent in making nothing but Tables. We 
carry a large line, and make patterns in a great number of the Period styles, such as 
William and Mary, Chippendale, Sheraton, Mission, Elizabethan, Colonial, Etc. 

Grand Rapids, Michigan 




Startling Figures Which Prove the Popularity of 

Voigt's 

Crescent 
-T^a. Flour 

H.-l<il)Hshcil in 18G8, 
making 150 bbU. of flour 
pur (lay, our capacity has 
increased to 1000 bbls. 
prr ila\ . During this 
prriiid we have manu- 
factured 1.431.000,000lbs. 
of good tlour. .Allowing 
200 lbs. for each person, 
this would feed 7,155,000 
people for one year or 
would supply the 110,000 
people in drand Rapiils 
with plenty of tlour fur 
more than 05 years. 

SURELY IT P.WS TO DO THINGS'VNTLL! 

\ OIGT MILLING COMPANY, Grand Rapids, Mich. 



P S ^ 

ROUUER 

B P B 

HILLS. 

B e e 



e B B e 




83 



60,000 Square Feet Devoted Exclusively to the Manufacturing 
of All Kinds of Set Up and Folding Paper Boxes :: :: 



" 5J5 15 sri 53 

m Mm III M H ... 
-1 ia lis ". 

1*1 •ll "l-^-l- 




Grand Rapids Paper Box Co. 

19 - 23 East Fulton Street 



Hotel Pantlind 

European Plan 
FINEST CAFE IN THE CITY 

Music 

Noonday Luncheon from 12 to 2 p. m., 50 
cents. Every day Sunday included. Sunday 
night Table D' Hote dinner from 5:30 to 8 
p. m., 75 cents. 

Chinese Dishes a Specialty 



Morton House 

American Plan 

The new Grill Room Cafe which has been 
open to Ladies only on Sundays is now 
open to them every day, Sundays included 



HOTEL OTTAWA 

OTTAWA BEACH 

S u m m e r Seas o n O n 1 y 



J. BOYD PANTLIND, Prop. 



84 




Factory of Sligh Furniture Company, 
Manufacturers of Everything for the Bedroom 



Business commenced in 
1865 by B. W. Putnam 
with two assistants ::: 



In the new home, 1910, 
there are 70,000 square 
feet of space and 200 
people arc employed ::: 




National Candy Company 

PUTNAM FACTORY. R. R. BEAN, Manager 

Commerce and Cherry Streets, Grand Rapids, Michigan 



85 




Plant of The O. & W. Thum 

Company, Manufacturers of Tanglefoot Fly Paper and Tree 

Tanglefoot Grand Rapids, Michigan, U. S. A. 



This Space Belongs to 

THE DAILY NEWS 

All the News that's Fit to Print" 



44 



A live, clean, progressive home 
paper, owned and published by 
Grand Rapids people ::: ::: 



It's Independent— though fair always 



DO YOU SEE IT REGULARLY? 



86 




G 



HAND RAPIDS possesses 
a most unusual industry 
in the firm of J. W. 
York & Sons, manufacturers of Brass 
Band Instruments. In 1882 this 
business was established in the small- 
est possible manner, but because of 
the uniform excellence of its product, 
it was destined to prosper from the 
very beginning. So steadily and 
rapidly did the business grow that 
today it occupies an enviable posi- 
tion in its field — as a matter of fact, 
no house in the country produces 
more Brass Band Instruments than 
(he House of York — and nowhere 
are belter instruments made. 

The plant owned by this firm 
has a floor space of 3(1. 01)0 square 
feet and is a model in every respect, having been designed for the use to which it is being put Being perfectly 
ventilated and well lighted throughout, the one hundred and fifty men employed are enabled to work under ideal 
conditions, thereby insuring high grade workmanship. Atrip through this establishment is most interesting to say 
the least. In the stock room one sees rack after rack filled with sheet brass, brass rod and brass tubing. From 
these materials a complete line of Cornets, Trumpets, Horns. Altos. Tenors, Baritones, Euphoniums, and Basses is 
made in every detail. Needless to say, in the process of manufacture some very interesting and unusual as well as 
complex operations are involved. 

Instruments manufactured by this firm can be found in every well appointed band in the country, and there 
are also a very large number of leading musical organizations using York instruments exclusively. 



STICKLEY BROS. CO., The Old House 

Manufacturers of Quaint Furniture in Arts and Crafts and English Morocco Furniture 

Established l88o .^HB^ ^^ Incorporated 1891 




87 




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GRAND RAPIDS CHAIR COMPANY 



FLOOR SPACE FOR RENT 





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PEARL ST. 



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LJiUii 



,3.3 

^TT"? 3 3 5 5 3 3 
5 1 3 3 3 3 3 3 5 



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Low Rents 

Cheap Power 

from our own 

plant 



An ideal Idfiition for factory, 
office or exliil)ition space. Can 
furnish large or small rooms. 
Strength of floors suitable for 
heavy machinery. Daylight 
on four sides, and large sky- 
lights. Electric power and 
light, steam heat, water, ele- 
vators, night watchman and 
all modern facilities furnished. 



F. RANIVILLE CO., Owners and Lessors 

Main Office, Pearl Street by the Bridge, Grand Rapids, Michigan 
Also Manufacturers of Belting and Supplies 



88 



You must pay Life Insurance prem- 
iums to somebody— then why not to 
the Home Company ? 



THE PREFERRED LIFE I.\SVRA.\CE COMPANY gives you a chance not only to keep 

your iiiiini y at Imnif. Ijut to lirlp liriuf; niouey from (lutside. We expect to do business away 
fniMi (lur own state soon, but we must have the endorsement of our home people first. TEX MIL- 
LION' DOLLARS goes east from Michigan every year for insurance premiums. If you want that 
money to stay here to be invested here — Boost, '"You know how." Your endorsement of our 
company (VOL — MR. READER) is of more value to us than you realize. 

\Ae offer a policy as good as the best — at low premium rates. ^Ye want to show you our 
goods, to tell yim of our plans. Call us up and give us that opportunity at least. It will put you 
uiidiT no ol)ligalions to Ijuy. Your time is valuable, and we won"t ask you for but a little of it. 

We want you to lake your next policy with us. We can insure your life, protect your 
income and safeguard your business. 

\M11 you grant us an interview, at no obligation to yourself; if so, phone us today 

The Preferred Life Insurance Company of America 

HOME OFFICE— MICH, TRUST COMPAXY BLDG. 

JAS. R. WYLIE, President W. A. WATTS. Secy and Gen'I Mgr, 



The Century Furniture Co. 

PARLOR, LIBRARY, LIVING-ROOM 
UPHOLSTERED FURNITURE, 
DINING CHAIRS, AND CHAMBER 
CHAIRS AND ROCKERS :: :: 




Accurate reproductions of the best models 
in all the Great French Styles, and also the 
Queen Anne, Sheraton, Heppehvhite, Chip- 
pendale and Colonial designs. Also English 
Morocco Leather Goods. 

Many reproductions from famous exclusive 
collections of antiques. 



89 



ROYAL FURNITURE CO. 

CiRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 



Makers of High 
Grade Furniture 



COLONIAL, SHERATON, ¥ 

CHIPPENDALE 

In Mahogany o n 1 y 




j^. 



m 




Rindge, Kalmbach, Logie & Co., Ltd. 

10 N. Ionia Street GRAND RAPIDS, MICHIGAN 

Shoe Manufacturers and Wholesalers 



90 




Hall 
Clocks 



\vc'iu\' Designs 



W'e are the only firm in 
the I'nited Statts manufac- 
turing both Hall Clock 
Cases and movements, and 
who sell direct from factor>- 
tD individual at a price 
earning but one profit. 
The takinR advantage of our 
method will insure you with 
a fine, highest grade Hall 
Clock at about one-half its 
regular retail price. The 
great value of a Hall Clock 
is in the movement, which 
is hidden by the dial. Ever>- 
clock carries our full guar- 
antee. The line Is always 
on show at ourfactori.- sales 
room. If you cannot call 
and personally inspect them 
write for catalog i6. 



Grand Rapids 
Clock & Man- 
tel Company 

Grand Rapids. Mich. 



Electrotyping 

B>- all ilu- .Mi)>i MockTii Ak'ihotls 

LEAD MOULDED ELECTROS 

STEELTYPES 

NICKELTYPES 

"AD" PLATES 

PAPIER MACHE "MATS" 

Get our Prices. 
Grand Rapids Electrotype Co. 

H. L. ADZIT, Manager 

Foot of Lyon St. 
Grand Rapids, Michigan 



Our Printers Supply Department 

is fully stocked with everything for 
the Printery. Send for catalogue. 



LEMON & WHEELER COMPANY 

WHOLKSAI.P: grocers Established 1872 



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KALAMAZOO 



GRAM) RAIMDS 



Warehouses— Petoskey, Traverse City, Manistee 



91 



Illustrating some of the Buildings recently completed by us. 




U. S. POST OFFICE. Ann Arbor, Mich. 



V. S. POST OFFICE & COURT HOUSE, Ocala. Fla. 



C. Hoertz & Son 

58 Porter Block 
General Contractors 



We are the only builders ni this city that do 

this class of work 



92 



EASIER TO TALK 
DON'T WALK 



The Automatic Service is far the best 
whether for Local or Long Distance talking 



THE CITIZENS 
TELEPHONE CO. 



Furnishes this Superior Service and at 
extremely favorable rates. x'\ncl it has 
far more patrons than can be reached in 
any other way. ::: ::: ::: ::: 



Citizens Stock is a Good Investment 

Inquire about it. 



93 



Grand Rapids, Holland & 
Chicago Electric Railway 



Offers the Shipjx'rs of Grand Rapids 

Fast Service on all Freight to 
Chicago and all Points Beyond 



Over-Night Between Grand Rapids & Chicago 

Leave 6 P. M. Arrive 5 A. M. 

Connecting with Fast Merchandise Trains 

of the 

Illinois Central, St. Paul, Northwestern, R(,ck Island, Santa Fe, Wabash, Alton, 
Soo Line, Great Western, C.& E.I., Burlington and All Other Connections 



GRAND RAPIDS, HOLLAND Sc CHICAGO RAILWAY 

GRAHAM AND MORTON BOATS 

THE GRAND RAPIDS-CHICAGO SHORT LINE 

CHAS. A. FLOYD, General Freight AkoU E. S. ("RAW. C. I'. A. 



94 



llllllllllllllllilll! 



te 




IHIIIII!! 



illlllllllllllllllilllllli 



After the government (who have been oceupying our 
l)uil(Ung' as a temporary post office) have moved, we 
will install one of the most up-to-date ])rintin.y and 
en,i;raving i)lants. and will furnish a service that will 
be just a little ahead of the rest. :: :: :: :: 



Dickinson Brothers 

ENGRAVKRS - PRINTERS 

Grand Rapids, Michigan, U. S. A. 






LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 





016 099 511 7 •